8 Crocs You Will Actually Want to Wear

8 Crocs You Will Actually Want to Wear

8 Crocs You Will Actually Want to Wear

The Croc renaissance is upon us.

The Croc renaissance is upon us.

Text: Luana Harumi

Ah, Crocs. Like so many Y2K trends, the (in)famous foam clogs have made a comeback – and it looks like this time they’re here to stay. After reportedly having their best sales year in 2020 and even making an appearance at the Oscars, the shoemakers reported a sales surge of 64% in its first quarter, to $460 million, according to CNN. The brand also stepped up its 2021 sales projection, saying it expects the revenue to increase between 40% and 50% this year. 

The colorful shoes have inspired numerous memes and nose-wrinkling over the years, but they’re arguably some of the most comfortable footwear options out there – meaning they’re a great pick for everyone working from home this past year. And with recent sold-out collaborations with the likes of Justin Bieber, Bad Bunny, and even KFC, the Croc seems to be as hyped as ever. Take a look at some of VMAN’s favorite styles:

Crocs x Palace

Photo via Palace.

The classic Crocs model comes revamped in a brown camo pattern as part of Palace’s Summer 2021 collection. The shoes are adorned with special Jibbitz (Crocs’ collectible “charms”) and Palace Tri-Ferg details at the strap. Palace’s Summer 2021 collection will make its first drop on May 7. Learn more on PalaceSkateboards.com.

The Marbled Clog

Photo via Crocs.

The newly-released marbled shoe brings a colorful twist to the classic comfortable clog, resulting in a model that is quite reminiscent of Christopher Kane’s 2017 Crocs – the first-ever designer collaboration with the brand. Available in three colors for $54.99 at Crocs. com

Bistro Tie-Dye Clog

Photo via Crocs.

These tie-dye-inspired clogs are the go-to option for a bolder statement Croc. The Bistro Pro LiteRide line was specially designed for food service, hospitality, and healthcare workers, who typically have to stand up through longer shifts – so expect extra comfort. Available for $59.99 at Crocs.com

Bad Bunny Crocs

Photo via Crocs.

The limited-edition Bad Bunny Crocs come in pristine white and are decorated with glow-in-the-dark Jibbitz inspired by the Puerto Rican singer, with a bunny detail replacing the classic Croc button – and it was a hard grab: the shoes reportedly sold out in 15 minutes. They can now cost up to $380 on StockX.com

Crocs x Drew House

Photo via Drew House.

Justin Bieber’s clothing brand has collaborated twice with Crocs, with the latest release dropping this past March. The Victoria Beckham-snubbed lavender version of the classic Croc designed by Bieber comes with oversized cartoon Jibbitz and has been selling for as much as $189 on StockX.com, while the previous yellow version has sold for as much as $580.

Crocs x Post Malone

Photo via Crocs.

Post Malone is by now a seasoned Croc partner, with five limited-edition collaborations dropping over the past few years. The latest was a double-take on the Duet Max Clog II, which was released in jet black and hot pink versions. Currently available at StockX.com for the lowest ask of $140.

Crocs x Chinatown Market

Photo via Crocs.

Another frequent Croc collaborator, Chinatown Market recently dropped a colorful tie-dye model decorated with multiple Grateful Dead Bears Jibbitz positioned in a way that looked like they were climbing colorful wall rock holds – and has sold for as much as $1,000 on StockX.com (though the price has now dropped considerably). 

The OG Croc

Photo via Crocs.

Finally, if you want a more... traditional option, there’s always the Classic Clog, which you can style however you want with or without the brand’s quirky charms. Available in multiple colors for $49.99 at Crocs.com.

Credits: Cover photo via Crocs.

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