In the Studio with Bryce Vine and Pheelz

In the Studio with Bryce Vine and Pheelz

In the Studio with Bryce Vine and Pheelz

The two musicians discuss their collaboration on new breakup anthem, "Help"

The two musicians discuss their collaboration on new breakup anthem, "Help"

Text: Nicholson Baird

Byrce Vine is on a roll, releasing his second single of November, “Help” featuring Pheelz. The song is a dance breakup anthem, where Vine declares he doesn't need help from any girl or ex. With over two billion streams across streaming platforms, it’s easy to say that Vine is a certified hitmaker. “Help” comes after an extremely productive year for the singer; after a long line of singles, the artist seems to be in a nonstop rhythm of music-making. Vine’s collaborator on the single, Pheelz, is a Lagos artist who is known for his blend of R&B, Afrobeats, and mainstream pop. 

In addition to the single, the two musicians have released a music video for the song, where Vine is shown as being fed up with the aloofness of his girlfriend. Through the help of a pixelated Pheelz in a vintage video game, Vine ditches his toxic ex. The song and video are emblematic of the music Vine is best known for–spirited hits that surround love, or lack thereof. “Help” is a track perfect for driving with the windows down, or playing somewhere on a beach. Ahead of their release, VMAN sat down with Vine and Pheelz to talk about the song's inspiration, collaborating, and their upcoming year.

VMAN: Congrats on the latest track, “Help”! How did this collaboration come to be? How did you guys first connect?

BRYCE VINE: When I finished writing this song I realized it was missing something. I truly think afrobeat is going to be the next big thing in pop, and when I first heard “Finesse” by Pheelz while I was taping Wild ‘n Out in ATL I knew I needed to seek him out. 

PHEELZ: Yeah, I remember my manager hit me up about Bryce and after listening to his music, I fell in love with it. The idea for my verse came immediately after hearing the song. I played it for him on FaceTime and he lost his mind.

VMAN: Once you guys decided to collaborate, what was it like in the studio with you guys? From the images, it looks like you guys are having a great time. Can you bring us into the studio vibe and atmosphere?

BV: In my experience, artists’ egos can get in the way of a good song coming together. Pheelz is all about the art and good vibes. He goes into everything with the mindset “I am just myself.” He was a pleasure to create with.

P: There was a lot of weed in the studio and it was a fun session. It felt like we had known each other for some time and were just linking up after a long time. It was very organic–nothing forced. He was also very respectful and we made a banger.

Photo by Ryan Scott Graham.

VMAN: What did your songwriting process look like? Did you write a beat first or write the lyrics first?

P: For me, the beat first then the melodies for the lyrics. It took me a while to put the lyrics together, but it was definitely the beat first.

BV: A lot of my best songs get strung together over time. The guitar part came first and that’s what we wrote over. Writing a song is like chiseling a statue. You have an idea that just keeps becoming more defined as the image in your head for it does. Technically this hook is 5 years old. 

VMAN: Five years? That's crazy. Can either of you elaborate on the song’s message? Was it formed from a specific experience?

BV: I recently had a very bizarre breakup. I found out something pretty damn shocking. The song for me is dedicated to moving on from that toxic relationship. 

P: Yeah, this is something I can relate to because I feel like I’ve had a handful of those experiences in my life. Being able to relate to the message helped with my verse as well because I was thinking about a few exes while I was writing those lyrics. Man, shout out to my exes, thanks for the inspiration.

Photo by Ryan Scott Graham.

VMAN: Bryce, you’ve worked with other artists in the past, what’s unique about working with Pheelz?

BV: Having grown up in LA, I’ve seen a lot of artists come and go. Pheelz is truly grateful and appreciative to make music. Period. It’s refreshing to work with an artist that has that kind of passion.

V: Amazing and Pheelz, what’s unique about Bryce that you can share?

P: It’s his spirit. He has a unique spirit. I think he has seen a lot and learnt a lot and you can tell from meeting him. He’s a good soul and really hard working.

Photo by Ryan Scott Graham.

VMAN: Can each of you share your favorite moment thus far of working together?

P: For me, it would be the photo shoot. We went around LA taking pictures on the street and smoking weed. Definitely my favorite moment so far. We plan on getting together some more to hang out and record more music.

BV: My favorite moment was us trying to tape this thing for Chinese radio while we were high, and we were just fucking it up so many times. I don’t think we ever got it right.

VMAN: Finally, what intentions are you each setting, going into the new year?

BV: There was a while where I stopped enjoying making music. I had to tap back in with that punk rock loving 13 year old playing guitar in the garage. My music makes people happy and I realize I don’t need to be more than that. It’s enough. The rest will come when it comes.

P: For me, I want to tour the world. That’s my dream for next year. I want to get on as many stages as I can, perform, meet fans, and just tell a good story. That’s pretty much it. Tour the world and meet people.

Photo by Ryan Scott Graham.
Credits: Images courtesy of Warner Records

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