Cottweiler FW19 Recap: "The Lost Art of Cruising"

Cottweiler FW19 Recap: "The Lost Art of Cruising"

Their latest collection was inspired by gay culture and the nostalgia for intimacy-sans-internet.

Their latest collection was inspired by gay culture and the nostalgia for intimacy-sans-internet.

Text: Zoe Elefterin

The two designers of Cottweiler, Matthew Dainty and Ben Cottrell, named their FW19 collection, “The Lost Art of Cruising”, an activity deeply based in the physical and public realm, and a verb that rings back to times sans internet. It was the pursuit of intimacy by gay people, without apps or direct messages.The location of the showa 12-story-deep cement parking lot, flashed back to common cruising locations.

Large, stone-like urinals presented themselves as the initial statement of the show. Covered in unattractive sludge-like moss with water sprouting out of them, there is a reference to Marcel Duchamp, the artist who notoriously named a urinal “Fountain” and called it art in 1917. The urinal-as-art calls back to a time of transformation, an upheaval in the time of tradition, a concept that certainly felt present in this collection.

Of course, there were references to gay culture, with towels attached to belts, dog leashes without dogs, and luxurious transparent shirts. The clothing felt interestingly in tune with earth shades of greens and blues with organic patterns that had a certain nature-taking-back-the-earth vibe which felt like the perfect place for humanity and sexuality to exist in peace. Noteworthy moments included Reebok sneaker/loafer hybrids, a collaboration with Italian outerwear brand, Allegri, who created some gorgeous raincoats, and a hand-dyed olive green coat complete with three zippers and a flash of skin.

Browse the collection below.

Credits: Slideshow Images via British Vogue       Cover Image via @mitchell_sams

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