DIOR HOMME PRE-FALL 2019 SHOWS A UTOPIAN FUTURE

DIOR HOMME PRE-FALL 2019 SHOWS A UTOPIAN FUTURE

Kim Jones taps Tokyo, Japan as both a location for the show and as a source for inspiration.

Kim Jones taps Tokyo, Japan as both a location for the show and as a source for inspiration.

Text: Brandon Tan

Under the helm of a freshly-appointed Kim Jones, the Dior man walked his first Pre-Fall runway last night. The Dior Homme show took place in Tokyo, following in the catwalks of French comrades who’ve shown in Japan, including Valentino who showed its PF19 collection in Tokyo just a few days ago, and Louis Vuitton’s Cruise 2018 show hosted in Kyoto. 

“A fashion show in Tokyo is the best way to present and celebrate my first Dior pre-fall men’s show. Japan is a magical country that I know quite well and that I love particularly for its incredible and unique culture, history and nature, which have always been very fascinating and a great source of inspiration to me," said Kim Jones in a statement.

Not only was Japan tapped by Jones as a location for the show, but also as a clear source for inspiration. Notes of Japanese culture bled throughout, and with so much tradition to draw upon, it seemed Dior Homme had found an entirely new world in which a robot stood front a center. Designed by Japanese illustrator, Hajime Sorayama, a mammoth metal figure held center stage as lights and lasers bounced off its reflective body. An ode to technology—the future not just in media, but now too in fashion.

The show opened with a clear note that eloquently set a tone for looks to follow: Modern utilitarianism with absolutely no compromise in style or grandeur. Jones manifested a utopian Silicon Valley, where practicality implies neutral-toned silk cowl necks and tapered cargo pants in place of poly-blend crewnecks and cargo shorts. While looks showed clean and not lazy in their general sensibility, some garments read more streamline than others. Japanese cherry blossoms stamped the runway, but also shirts and jackets, offering a softer perspective to Jones' look into the future. 

Still riffing on the themes of function, the accessories ranging harnesses and cross-body bags also adopted iridescent fabrics and polished metals—details most likely carried out by Yoon Ahn, a Japanese designer behind the esteemed streetwear label AMBUSH, but also Dior Homme's jewelry designer by appointment of Kim Jones. Here, the Japanese influence grows two-fold. 

Closing the show were flashing lights, reminiscent of a rave, but as the male models walked single-file and poised, more evocative of a silent one.

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