Perry Ellis Gives Sportswear a Wild Twist for FW18 Show

Perry Ellis Gives Sportswear a Wild Twist for FW18 Show

Perry Ellis embraces youthful energy at FW18 NYFW Men's.

Perry Ellis embraces youthful energy at FW18 NYFW Men's.

Text: Jake Viswanath

"One thing that I always took with me was the idea of go anywhere dressing," Michael Macarri, creative director of Perry Ellis, remarked backstage at his Fall 2018 show during New York Fashion Week. "It wasn’t about go to work, wasn’t about what you wear on the weekends. It’s about this look you put together that can really take you anywhere." This season's collection, presented at the historic Hippodrome,  gives a new perspective on his "go anywhere dressing," challenging the notion of what can be deemed acceptable for any situation. And perhaps that was intentional. "I really wanted to infuse more of a lifestyle," he said. "How do you layer pieces that really mean something and establish more of a personality? People don’t really dress head-to-toe one way anymore."

They do, but only if they want to. The Fall 2018 collection still infuses the classic sports-y fabrics and patterns that Perry Ellis is known for, but does whatever it takes to freshen them up, not limited to exaggerated dimensions, pattern-blocking, and layering in unexpected ways. Dress shirts were paired with boldly hued bum bags, knit sweaters were given a graphic bomber touch, and jeans lost their professional touch, reminiscent of the classic '90s pieces you'd see on Saved By the Bell.

The '90s touch was definitely intentional, given that this season marked the first time that Maccarri brought original archival pieces to the runway, specifically sneakers from the early '90s. "It was probably one of the first times that logo became super important, and I feel like logos are important again," he said. "It’s really the time to kind of scream it." Given the loud patterns, logos, and hair on the runway (courtesy of RuPaul's Drag Race contestant Milk), those words feel apt.

The Perry Ellis man is always sleek and timeless, but maybe that archetype is shifting as what's considered professional continues to evolve. It's more relaxed than anything the brand has ever done, and in the age of athleisure, more youthful as well. And in the digital age of fashion, isn't that now the goal?

Credits: Photos courtesy of Perry Ellis.

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