Tuck In With These Albums When It Gets Cold

Tuck In With These Albums When It Gets Cold

Tuck In With These Albums When It Gets Cold

This fall, slow down with these new classics and old comforts.

This fall, slow down with these new classics and old comforts.

Text: Sophie Lee

Though we’re already well into October, the weather is just starting to cool off. That means it’s finally time to get out a mug of hot apple cider and some plaid scarves. When you’ve got yourself all tucked in on the couch, or draped nicely over a chilly park bench, turn the volume up on these exquisite albums. Some of them are comforting old classics, others are new-ish or brand new. All are equally easy to enjoy on a fall afternoon.

Bridge Over Troubled Water – Simon & Garfunkel

We’re starting the list off with an absolute gem, circa 1970. They’re number one here because when you think of cozy folk rock, these two mop-tops are probably the first that come to mind. “Bridge Over Troubled Water” the song, and “The Boxer” are both highlights on the album, and have been cited by Rolling Stone as two of the greatest songs of all time.

Folklore – Taylor Swift

Taylor Swift caused a downright raucous this year when she surprise released her eighth studio album “Folklore.” The record was a departure from her recent pop sound, instead favoring slow, folk/country jams and the storytelling chops of her youth. “cardigan,” the first single, tells a story of young love lost. “betty,” a true country melody, tells the same story from the other partner’s perspective. Though these two stand out, pretty much every song on here is worth putting on repeat.

Light Upon the Lake – Whitney

Whitney, a Chicago duo turned touring band, released this debut album in 2016. Singer Julien Ehrlich’s wispy falsetto floats over every song, a fusion of folk and jazzier elements. “Golden Days” is a particularly effective tune, telling a sad story over an upturned beat. Later in the album is “Red Moon,” a fully instrumental song featuring delightful horns. Your affection for this 10-track collection will only grow as you continue to listen.

Blonde – Frank Ocean

The only musical crime ever committed by Frank Ocean was when he decided to give us just two albums. Luckily, in 2016 we got the follow up to “channel ORANGE” with “Blonde.” It’s hard to pick favorites on an album so expansive, but “Godspeed” certainly delights. Despite various high points in the listing, it might be best to just put this one on from the top and let it play out.

Punisher – Phoebe Bridgers

Released earlier this year, Phoebe Bridgers strange and wonderful second studio album reminded listeners of how much we had grow to love her quiet drawl. “Garden Song” is a fan favorite, but the closer “I Know The End,” a nearly six minute track, features the full force of Bridgers whimsical songwriting ability. Though her songs make perfectly pleasant easy listening, a close read of these tracks reveals a truly stunning wordsmith.

The Smiths – The Smiths

Here’s another classic we’d be remiss to exclude. Love or hate Morrissey, he has a very distinctive and fall-friendly voice. The band’s debut album also features hits like “The Hand That Rocks The Cradle” and “This Charming Man.” Though the content of The Smith’s music can turn a bit dark, their songs are still perfect for a jaunty walk around the park, orange and fading leaves abound.

Souvenir – Jonah Yano

Jonah Yano released his debut album “Souvenir” earlier this year. The quiet and thoughtful singer put together a group of songs that are truly delightful. Opener “poor me” shows off the singers sweet, melodic tone. On the other end of the album, closer “shoes” is a collaboration with the singer’s father as they work through complicated family history. Like all of Yano’s work, it is both poignant and beautiful.

Dark Side of the Moon – Pink Floyd

The classic of all classics, didn’t we all have a “Dark Side Of The Moon” phase? This album needs little explanation. Find a free afternoon, put it on from the top, light some incense, lay down, close your eyes. Afterwards, you can tell all your friends about the strange and wonderful trip you took listening to Pink Floyd.

What’s Going On – Marvin Gaye

Another oldie, this 1971 smash hit is just as good now as it was back then. Opening track “What’s Going On” seems to be relevant at every single turn of history. The track is followed by “What’s Happening Brother,” a song similar in tone and melody, making for a near seven minute symphony of protest and smooth soul music. The rest of the album, though lesser known, is equally as enjoyable.

Pink Moon – Nick Drake

The following year, 1972, Nick Drake released “Pink Moon,” which has only grown in acclaim since the singer’s untimely passing. The beauty of his music, coupled with the unbelievable sadness of his short life, makes for a uniquely poignant listening experience. Drake leaves behind three wonderful albums, all summed up best in his most famous track “Pink Moon,” a lovely and breathy tribute to the April sky.

CTRL – SZA

When her album “Ctrl” was released in 2017, SZA dominated every available airwave for the following months, if not year. Hit tracks like “Supermodel” and “The Weekend” gained huge popularity. However, the R&B singer has plenty of other gems on this chill and melodic album. “Prom” is a lovely tune that will have you dancing in your living room. “Drew Barrymore” is very appropriate for the cold weather months with lyrics “Am I warm enough for ya, outside, baby/Is it warm enough for ya inside me, me, me, me?”

Gospel Train – Sister Rosetta Tharpe

No matter how much acclaim Sister Rosetta Tharpe gains over the years, it probably still won’t be enough. This mother of rock-and-roll did it before, and did it just as well, as all the big boys. Her album “Gospel Train” is wall to wall hits. “My Journey To The Sky” is a timeless classic that works equally well on a city street or country rode. If you have yet to hear Sister Rosetta Tharpe shred, what are you waiting for?

Credits: Images courtesy of artists.

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