Yayoi Kusama Infinity Mirror Rooms opens at London's Tate Modern

Yayoi Kusama Infinity Mirror Rooms opens at London's Tate Modern

Yayoi Kusama Infinity Mirror Rooms opens at London's Tate Modern

The exhibition features one of Kusama’s largest installations to date.

The exhibition features one of Kusama’s largest installations to date.

Text: Paul Madley

After a series of successful shows in Australia, Japan, LA, and the Netherlands, Yayoi Kusama’s latest blockbuster exhibition, Infinity Mirror Rooms, opens at London’s Tate Modern. Originally scheduled to open 12 months ago, the highly anticipated exhibition is finally open to the public. This new exhibit offers fans a rare chance to experience two of Kusama’s iconic installations, early documentation of her experimental performances, and events, as well as a brand-new sculptural work.

The exhibition features Infinity Mirrored Room – Filled with the Brilliance of Life, one of Kusama’s largest installations to date. Mirrored walls, a shallow pool of water and constellations of tiny lights create a feeling of infinite space. This immersive work is shown alongside Chandelier of Grief, another whole-room installation that allows the visitor to disappear in a seemingly boundless universe of rotating chandeliers. Since their conception, Kusama’s mirror rooms have become a global phenomenon, and she is often regarded as, ‘the artist for the Instagram generation’.

 

Infinity Mirrored Room - Filled with the Brilliance of Life

Infinity Mirrored Room – Filled with the Brilliance of Life

 

Born in 1929, in Matsumoto, Japan, Kausama moved to the States in the 1950s. She became a prominent member of the New York art scene and through her original, innovative work explored themes of repetition, and a powerful desire to communicate. She returned to her native Japan in 1977 and has voluntarily lived in a psychiatric facility ever since. Kusama said that she began to experience hallucinations at around the age of 10, she perceived patterns moving, multiplying, engulfing everything around her, and finally consuming her, a process she termed “Self Obliteration.” She began to paint out these visions, and used art as a tool to cope with her trauma. Despite her troubles, she’s had an incredible career that spans over six decades and is now more popular than ever.

 

Chandelier of Grief

Chandelier of Grief

 

Fashion favorite Marc Jacobs regards Kusama as one of his favorite living artists. The designer collaborated with the ‘Princess of polka dot’ on a 2012 collection for Louis Vuitton. Jacobs placed life-sized waxworks of Kusama in Vuitton windows across the globe. In a 2016 interview, he described Kusama as “the eternal radical”. He then went on to say how much he admires her “unapologetic dedication to her vision”. Kusama continues to make prolific art and receives critical acclaim.

Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirror Rooms is now open at Tate Modern and runs until June 2022. The institution is also showcasing the work of British artist Heather Phillipson.

Credits: Images Courtesy of Tate Modern.

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